Australia · autumn · kitchen renovation · mist · Mount Warning · native Australian birds · pets · sunrise · Tweed Valley

A Beautiful Sunrise

During this morning’s sunrise, the valley demonstrated all the beauty I know she is capable of. I call the valley “she” as I like to believe that everything natural in the valley is the creation of Mother Nature, in case anyone is wondering.

From the pink tinted sunrise sky to the formless mist lapping against the “shores” of the distant ranges, the entire valley was pure early morning perfection.

See the dark green “island” peeking through the “ocean” of mist?

And while gossamer waves of mist lapped the “shores” of the tree-covered islands …

… an early visitor arrived to join me in admiring the view, as the “waning gibbous” morning moon looked down on us from the waking sky.

Yesterday, between visits from the men installing our new kitchen benchtops, I restored my office back to it’s pre-new-floor-coverings condition. I also took the opportunity to get rid of anything that I no longer have a use for. There’s plenty of sorting and decluttering happening in this house currently! So tonight I am back at my desktop computer. No more fumbling with tiny keys on my iPhone – yay!

The kitchen renovation is scheduled to be finished by the end of this week. Tomorrow, the plumber arrives to restore water to my kitchen. Meanwhile, Bowie needed to investigate the new kitchen sink, as I knew he would. πŸ˜‰

Australia · clouds · Mount Warning · native Australian birds · subtropical weather · summer · sunrise · Tweed Valley

A Beautiful Summer’s Morning

The sky had the slightest tinge of pink early this morning, (although it doesn’t show up in the photo) and as the day progressed and the low cloud cleared, Mount Warning stood beautiful and clear in all her blue-green glory. I must be growing used to seeing clouds over the mountain though, as I chose this photo over clearer sky photos I took later in the day due to the character clouds add to the early morning sky.

Joining me to enjoy the early morning view from the tibouchina tree was my little Butcher Bird friend, Hoppy (of gammy leg fame) …

… and joining Hoppy was one of the two new additions to the Butcher Bird family this year.

While I was eating breakfast, I heard the sound of something we don’t hear a lot of now in these covid days – a ‘plane. And I knew from the whiring of the ‘plane’s engine that this was not a passenger ‘plane. It was here to fly over the valley and dust the crops. I had to zoom in fully to take the photo, and the photo is severely cropped, but at least the ‘plane is in focus. πŸ™‚

When I turned around from taking the photo of the crop-dusting ‘plane, I spotted Bubba Magpie. I’m not sure if he dropped by to say hello, or seeing my camera he decided to pose. Either way, the sun shining on his still-downie baby feathers lit up the black and white pattern which will progressively turn shiny black as he matures.

I have decided these two are an item now, so I will introduce them as Mr and Mrs Pee Wee. Although she is the newest addition to my regular feathered visitors, Mrs, on the left, seems quite dominent, and doesn’t hesitate to come right up close to me when I am feeding the birds their breakfast.

The weather felt warmer in temperature today than it has been, but the lower humidity made the warmth of the day very pleasant indeed.

I could get used to summer if every day felt as beautiful as today. ❀

Australia · family · gratitude · history · knowledge · memories · Mount Warning · remembering · sunrise · Tweed Valley

Hattons Bluff ~ Familial Pride

Hattons Bluff and the Hatton homestead. Photo taken c1869

On Australia Day this year – 26th January – the usual debate of who “owns” Australia broke out yet again. During one news channel interview, the interviewer ask the interviewee a very thought-provoking question. Without going into too much background as it is not a topic I wish to debate, although it adds context to my story, was this – If indigenous Australians were declared the “owners” of Australia, and all other nationalities of people were required to leave the country and go “home”, where in the world would the descendents of the early settlers, for example, move to, when Australia is the only home they have known for several generations?

This question opened up an interesting conversation between husband and myself. While I am a first generation Australian, my husband’s family, on all sides of his family tree, have lived in Australia for well over 100 years. The first of his ancestors arrived in 1833, while another early arrival was in 1853, that of Richard Hatton and his son, William. In every line of husband’s family tree, he is at least a fourth-generation Australian. After so many generations, the roots of his family tree are well anchored in this land.

William Hatton, husband’s two-times great-grandfather, was an early settler in the Tweed Valley region. William arrived in Australia in 1857 with his father, Richard. With Hattons Bluff being a well known landmark in the area, I have often asked husband in more recent years if his family might have a connection to Hattons Bluff. Husband didn’t know, and not being overly fond of family history, seemed disinclined to find out.

After the Australia Day debate, I became super-curious. Who was Hattons Bluff named after? Even if husband isn’t overly interested, I am the mother of four people who can confidentally claim to have roots in Australia which can be traced back seven generations. Besides, if there’s a story to be found, I want to know about it. πŸ˜‰

Hattons Bluff c1930

As I searched for information about Hattons Bluff which could potentially tie into my husband’s Hatton family, I found several old photos of the area. I am sharing three of these photos today, however, I cannot add a credit for any photographers as no names were listed. Undoubtedly, these photos have been passed along through the generation and the owner, or owners, have kindly shared the images online. For this, I thank them.

These photos, and the information I discovered online have confirmed that Hattons Bluff was named after my husband’s two-times great-grandfather, William Hatton. Husband’s grandmother shared many memories about her mother, a daughter of William named Emma Hatton, in the early years of our relationship, and I have racked my brain to try and recall if she ever told us about her family’s connection to this local landmark. I don’t think she did, but perhaps she did tell us and we were too young to appreciate the magnitude of the knowledge. Or perhaps it wasn’t an important enough story to share. Perhaps she took for granted her place in this country, in this state, in the Tweed Valley region, just as my husband does.

For me, it is a surreal concept to imagine, knowing that you are walking in the footsteps of a previous generation – indeed several generations – of people who if it were not for them, you wouldn’t exist. My husband really doesn’t know how lucky he is to have that immensely strong connection to the land on which he lives today.

Or does he?

This morning, as the rising sun battled with clouds to find a place to shine upon earth, husband noted the mist, swirling around the south and western base of Hattons Bluff. It’s well defined this morning, he announced.

Do I detect just the teenist note of familial pride creeping in? πŸ˜‰

 

 

Australia · clouds · family · history · Mount Warning · sunrise · Tweed Valley

Hattons Bluff ~ A Landmark of the Tweed Valley

There were a couple of showers of rain early this morning, so when I awoke at around 6:30 am, a few flimsy pockets of mist had formed in the valley.

My husband noticed mist surrounding Hattons Bluff, and suggested I take a photo. I had been complaining to husband that with all the rain we’ve had lately, I haven’t had a clear view of Huttons Bluff in ages. This morning, however, the mist circling the landmark accentuated its position next to Mount Warning.

Being interested in local history and family history, I had hoped that my husband would know something of the history of Hattons Bluff. Some time ago, I asked him what he knew about the area … “it’s next to Mount Warning” he told me. That was the extent of his knowledge! Being born and raised in this area, I had hoped he would know more, such as who the bluff was named after. Apparently not.

Now I have raised his curiosity, husband is curious about Hattons Bluff’s geographical position, so today, when business took him to the small town of Bray Park just outside of Murwillumbah, he took a closer photo of Hattons Bluff on his phone and sent it to me.

To the right of Hattons Bluff, Mount Warning can be seen peeking over the tops of the trees.

As for the history of Hattons Bluff, I have been doing some investigating, and have learned some information which I find intriguing! I will share my findings tomorrow. πŸ™‚